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how to ask for a Referral

Do you know how to ask for a referral?

If you don’t, you could be missing out on ways to improve your hospital’s reputation and intake.

Referrals are a powerful thing. Think about how patients choose hospitals. How do you think patients are choosing your hospital? Are your patients and their families telling the story of their stay?

People ask for referrals for all kinds of purchase decisions, including:

  • Lawyers

  • Physicians

  • Plumbers

  • Electricians

  • Restaurants

  • Car dealerships

  • Colleges

  • TV series

  • Financial planners

  • Realtors

  • Dentists

You yourself have likely asked for referrals for some of the above before making your own purchase decisions. You have likely also read the reviews, comments, and ratings of some of the above professions as well.

Do you like to look up hotels where you will stay, restaurants where you will dine? These are all forms of referrals.

Never underestimate the importance of referrals.

Here is How to Ask for a Referral

Referrals don't cost anything. Remember: people always know someone who can benefit from the services you provide. Referrals can lead to more referrals and bring your hospital more patients. This is why it is imperative to know how to ask for a referral properly.

It’s also important to remind people to spread the good word about the work that you do. You must ensure that patients receive the kindest, most personal care so that their referral is going to be positive.

Here are some great sentence-starters to use when asking for a referral. As patients thank you for their stay and are preparing to leave, consider saying the following:

  • “I am so pleased to hear you say we kept you comfortable. We’d be grateful if you’d share your experience with family and friends.”

  • “Would you do us a favor and tell them when you get home?”

These types of comments remind people to spread the good word about the good things that you do.

Why People Like to Give Referrals

People love giving referrals. It gives them the opportunity to brag about the service they got. When someone gets great service, they feel very thankful and feel that the company deserves to be rewarded for the service they provided.

People like to give referrals for the following reasons:

  • They were satisfied with the service and care provided and want to tell people about it.

  • They feel flattered by the great service they received.

  • They like giving their opinions.

  • They liked the people who provided them with great service.

  • They like being “in the know.”

  • Referrals make people look like experts.

  • Referrals benefit peoples’ friends.

  • Referrals are a great way to ‘pay it forward.’

To Summarize

At the end of the day, rather than worry about patient happiness, focus on:

  • Patient comfort

  • Patient participation

  • Patient education

  • Patient healing

By focusing on all of the above, your patients will speak vigorously about their stay with you.

To better understand how to ask for a referral and how to approach customer service, check out the book Raving Fans: A Revolutionary Approach to Customer Service.

Our ‘Do it’ Recommendations

To personally clarify the importance of referrals in your life, ask and answer the following three questions:

  1. What products and services do you like to obtain referrals for?

  2. Why do you like to give referrals?

  3. When and how would you ask patients for a referral to your hospital?

Everyone’s a Caregiver: Providing Education for Healthcare Workers

Everyone's a Caregiver provides education to healthcare workers to better improve their patient's overall experience. We understand the time constraints placed in today's workplace and have customized microlearning videos that can help you gain the skills you need to be a better, more positive healthcare worker. Contact us today to see how we can help, or click here to learn more.

Hospital Staff Members Are All Caregivers: Here’s Why

Each member of a hospital staff plays a huge role in how a hospital functions. They also all play a huge role in patient satisfaction.

HCAHPS scores are a direct result of how patients feel - and whether you’d like to believe it or not, all hospital staff members can affect these scores.

This is why it is important to take ownership of patient satisfaction, regardless of the position you hold at a hospital.

All Hospital Staff Members Are Caregivers

When you’re asked what you do, how do you answer?

Do you say:

  • “I’m a caregiver”
  • “I help patients get well”
  • “I work in healthcare as an IT professional and keep our computers running”

Everyone is a caregiver. There are those who serve the patients, and those who serve the patients. In order to succeed in our HCAHPS scores, it is crucial that we all see ourselves as caregivers.


“We must become the change we want to see in the world”
- Gandhi

The only significant power we have to effect change is through example.

The Patient’s Perception

A patient’s perception of their experience is based on a nurse's timely, empathetic response to call lights as well as timely supportive help to the bathroom.

But did you know that this perception is based on the responsiveness of so many other staff positions? In fact, a patient’s perception likely includes anyone who comes to their room.

This is because most patients think that anyone in scrubs is a nurse. This means that members of the dietary staff, a housekeeper, a phlebotomist, or any other staff members, are often mistaken for nurses.

HCAHPS caregivers include but are not limited to:

  • Nurses
  • CNAs
  • Physicians
  • Hospitalists
  • Pharmacy
  • Unit secretary
  • Receptionist
  • Housekeeping
  • Lab
  • Dietary
  • Physical therapy/OT
  • Imaging
  • Transporters
  • ER
  • Business office
  • Maintenance

It is vital to remember that a patient's perception of responsiveness includes interaction with every hospital staff member they have interacted with. This can include telephone reception, engineers fixing an elevator, a maintenance worker, a transporter, a doctor, a radiology technician, and everything in between.

The Takeaway

  1. Never make a patient feel like a number.
  2. Empathetic, timely responsiveness is CRITICAL.
  3. Everyone is a caregiver.

All members of hospital staff are caregivers, whatever the role is. If you work in a hospital, you are a caregiver.

We are also all first responders. We all have an opportunity at some point to respond to a patient or those who serve the patient. Responsiveness means all hands on deck. You don't have to be a clinician to respond with kindness and a servant's heart to a patient or family in need.

Think of yourself as revolutionaries on the front looking after patients. Always provide empathy and timely service to patients and their families. Gracefully fulfill their requests.

Our ‘Do it’ Recommendations

  1. Honor and recognize every team member as a caregiver whether they are at the bedside or not.
  2. In one sentence or less, describe and clarify how you make a difference as a caregiver to either the patient or to those who serve the patient
  3. Cultivate a vision to see yourself and all of your peers as First Responders.

Everyone’s a Caregiver: Providing Education for Healthcare Workers

Everyone's a Caregiver provides education to healthcare workers to better improve their patient's overall experience. We understand the time constraints placed in today's workplace and have customized microlearning videos that can help you gain the skills you need to be a better, more positive healthcare worker. Contact us today to see how we can help, or click here to learn more.

Patient care positive attitude

How do you focus on achieving a positive attitude?

Your attitude affects every single aspect of your life - from your personal life to your professional life, to the lives of the patients you take care of.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • Does your attitude change from day-to-day?
  • Is your attitude the type of attitude that people want to be around?
  • If attitude was contagious, would you want anyone to catch yours?

These are all vital questions you should be asking yourself, especially if you are in the healthcare industry.

This quote from Nobody's Home: Candid Reflections of a Nursing Home Aide by Thomas Edward Gass hones in on the importance of having a positive attitude in healthcare:

“Based upon our attitude we can either bring Joy or Misery.”

The book highlights the fact that attitude is a vital aspect of almost everything we do. In fact, every question we ask a patient has some root in a positive attitude.

Remember: Attitude is contagious. It affects and impacts everyone around you. Think about what it is like to be around a grouch. When you’re around a negative person, does it lift you up, or bring you down?

In most cases, it will bring you down.

Not everyone shares the same level of positive attitude and engagement like you. Keeping this in mind, here are five attitudes of engagement at a hospital.

The Importance of a Positive Attitude: 5 Attitudes of Engagement at a Hospital


  1. Superstars: 3% of the workforce. They will always rise to the top
  2. Winners: 20% of the workforce. They come in early, stay late, and have a desire to contribute. They want to get ahead and make a difference
  3. Grinners: Over 50% of the workforce. These employees just get by. They are there for a paycheck and typically just sit on a fence. Leadership and coaching are vital for Grinners.
  4. Whiners: 25 % of the workforce. They do as little as possible and always want something for nothing. They have toxic attitudes with co-workers and/or patients.
  5. Slugs: 2-10 % of the workforce. Slugs are counterproductive. Management keeps them around because they don't want frontline staff to work short, but they shouldn't really be there. These people are negative and have a bad work ethic.

Ask yourself:


  1. Which attitude do you think you show?
  2. Which attitude would your peers say you represent?
  3. What is the best way to communicate with each of the five attitudes?

Attitude Matters

Remember: Attitude always matters.

No patient or co-worker wants to be around someone who is negative, or worse, indifferent. Does a negative attitude serve you well? Does it serve anyone well?

A negative attitude will bring people down, and the type of attitude you have - whether negative or positive - has a domino effect. When you are positive, it shines a light on you and everyone around you.

“Brighten the corner where you are.”

How would you gauge your attitude? How would other people rate your attitude on a scale of one to ten? These are all important questions to ask yourself, especially when working in healthcare. This is because, in a hospital environment, your attitude can have a direct impact on patients as well as coworkers.

If someone around you is negative, don’t let that negativity consume you. You cannot let the things that you can’t control interfere with the things that you can control.

Focus on creating a positive attitude and making a difference with each and every single patient you interact with. Bring a light and shine it wherever you are, because at the end of the day, making a difference is up to you.


Our ‘Do it’ Recommendations

  1. Please state a recent example of how you maintained a positive winner’s attitude when in a difficult situation with a patient or team member
  2. Describe the positive outcome achieved as a result. How did it feel?

Everyone’s a Caregiver: Providing Education for Healthcare Workers

Everyone's a Caregiver provides education to healthcare workers to better improve their patient's overall experience. We understand the time constraints placed in today's workplace and have customized microlearning videos that can help you gain the skills you need to be a better, more positive healthcare worker. Contact us today to see how we can help, or click here to learn more.

Patient Satisfaction: Why It’s Important For You and Your Patients

Did you know that patient satisfaction not only helps patients recover, but also enhances employee morale and even creates job security?

It's also a huge factor for a hospital's well-being

When a hospital has great client satisfaction, it improves every aspect of the hospital - from the hospital’s community, to patient happiness, to the well-being and mental health of hospital staff, and more. When the patients are happy, the employees are happy, and vice-versa. This results in a positive environment that helps make hospitals more competitive, and ultimately, more profitable.

Client satisfaction is so much more than just providing great care. It’s the right thing to do.

In healthcare, patient satisfaction is often a good indicator of the quality of care that is provided. Not only does it affect patient retention, but it also affects clinical outcomes, medical malpractice claims, and more.

Here are a few reasons why patient satisfaction is so important, and how you can do a part in providing great healthcare to improve client satisfaction.

What is Your Personal Mission?

When it comes to patient satisfaction, what is your personal mission?

One of your core and true missions should be to provide loving and compassionate care for every patient with no exceptions.

Patient satisfaction is an indicator of the type of treatment a patient is receiving and how well they are being treated. It is also an indicator of how satisfied the patient is about the treatment they are receiving. This measure of care quality gives us valuable insights into aspects of our job and allows us to understand the effectiveness of our care as well as of our own level of understanding.

When it Comes to Client Satisfaction, Personal Engagement is No Longer an Option

“It doesn’t take an instant more, or cost a penny more, to be empathetic than it does to be indifferent.”
- Brian Lee

Personal engagement is no longer an option. Without it we can improve the patient experience, clinical outcomes, hospital readmissions, hospital-acquired infections, and more.

It is crucial that we use personal engagement in our work to increase patient satisfaction and get the results we want.

If you do not use personal engagement every day, patients will not comply as they should. A lack of personal engagement and empathy does not provide a safe place for patients. If we don’t personally engage ourselves in work, patient satisfaction will go down.

The Right thing to Do

Being personally engaged with your patients is the right thing to do.

Our own personal engagement is evidence of our desire to serve others and to help others. Patient satisfaction not only improves a patient’s stay, but it also enhances job satisfaction for the staff treating these patients.

There are many reasons why patient satisfaction is important, and there are many reasons why we should try our absolute best to improve patient satisfaction. Here are some reasons.


  • Our community deserves it
  • It makes patients happier
  • Enhance job satisfaction and employee morale
  • Creates job security
  • Helps us grow our market share
  • Makes us more competitive
  • Makes us more profitable
  • It’s the right thing to do.

Never Underestimate the Importance of Patient Satisfaction

Patient satisfaction is one of the most important parts of health care.

It is important for a number of reasons. Not only is it important from a business standpoint, but it also improves a patient's life and health. Patient satisfaction attracts new patients, builds loyalty, improves clinical outcomes, and even minimizes the risk of litigation.

Patients who are satisfied with their health care are more likely to tell others about their experience. They are also more likely to come back to the same facility.

To improve customer satisfaction, be sure to focus on:

  • Reducing wait times
  • Learning technology
  • Fostering communication
  • Giving patients the option of filling out a satisfaction survey at the end of their stay

Our ‘Do it’ Recommendations

1. Write down 3 reasons why customer satisfaction is important to you.

2. Seek every opportunity to proudly share these reasons with your patients and team members.

Everyone's a Caregiver provides education to healthcare workers to better improve their patient's overall experience. We understand the time constraints placed in today's workplace and have customized microlearning videos that can help you gain the skills you need to be a better healthcare worker. Contact us today to see how we can help, or click here to learn more.